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Churches of California




Ekbalein Evangelic Community - California Church

Ekbalein Evangelic Community

Address: 14701 Friar Street Van Nuys,CA 91411
Phone:
1-866-EKBALEIN

Description: Brazilian church to the brazilian community in Los Angeles and Las Vegas



Holy Cross Church - Los Angeles Catholic Church

Holy Cross Church

Address:
4705 S Main St - Los Angeles, CA 90037
Phone:
(323) 234-5984

 

Hispanic Catholic Church - Los Angeles Area

Hispanic Catholic Church


Address: 812 N Alvarado St - Los Angeles, CA 90026
Phone:
(213) 484-6142


Brazilian Evangelical Church- California

Brazilian Evangelical Church


Address:
9851 Bixby Ave - Garden Grove, CA 92841
Phone:
(714) 534-9437



Brazilian Church Assembly of God- San Diego California

Brazilian Church Assembly of God


Address:
1135 Garnet Ave - San Diego, CA 92109
Phone:
(858) 483-4816



Brazilian Church Assembly of God- San Diego California

Brazilian Church Assembly of God


Address:
1135 Garnet Ave - San Diego, CA 92109
Phone:
(858) 483-4816






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Roman Catholicism in Brazil

Brazil's strong Roman Catholic heritage can be traced to the Iberian missionary zeal, with the fifteenth-century goal of spreading Christianity to the infidels. In the New World, these included both Amerindians and African slaves. In addition to conversion, there were also strong efforts to enforce compliance with Roman Catholicism, including the Inquisition, which was not established formally in Brazil but nonetheless functioned widely in the colonies. In the late nineteenth century, the original Roman Catholic populace of Iberian origin was reinforced by a large number of Italian Catholics who immigrated to Brazil, as well as some Polish and German Catholic immigrants.

According to all the constitutions of the republican period, there is no state or official religion. In practice, however, separation of church and state is weak. Government officials generally avoid taking action that may offend the church.

Brazil is said to be the largest Roman Catholic country in the world. In 1996 about 76 percent of the population, or about 122 million people, declared Roman Catholicism as their religion, as compared with 89 percent in 1980. The decline may have resulted from a combination of a real loss of influence and a tendency to be more objective in answering census questions about religion.

As in most dominant religions, there is some distance between nominal and practicing Catholics. Brazilians usually are baptized and married in the Roman Catholic Church. However, according to the CNBB (National Conference of Brazilian Bishops), only 20 percent of nominal Catholics attend Mass and participate in church activities, but the figure may be as low as 10 percent. Women attend Mass more often than men, and the elderly are more active in church than the young. In the 1990s, charismatic forms of Catholicism used unconventional approaches, along the line of those used by Pentecostal Protestant groups, to attempt revitalization and increase active participation.

Popular or traditional forms of Catholicism are widespread in the interior of the country. Many Brazilians pray to figures such as Padre Cícero (a revered priest who lived in Ceará from 1844 to 1934), make pilgrimages to the site of the appearance of Brazil's patron saint, our Lady of the Appearance (Nossa Senhora Aparecida), and participate in traditional popular rites and festivities, such as the Círio in Belém and the Festa do Divino in central Brazil. Some use expressions of religious origin, such as asking for a blessing on meeting someone older or responding "God willing" (Se Deusquiser ) when someone says "See you tomorrow."

During the 1970s, the progressive wing of the church made an "option for the poor." They were influenced by the doctrine of liberation theology (see Glossary), in which Brazilian theologians such as Leonardo Boff played a leading role, and followed the decision of the Latin American Bishops' Conference in Medellín, Colombia, in 1968. The church organized Ecclesiastical Base Communities (Comunidades Eclesiais de Base--CEBs; see Glossary) throughout the country to work for social and political causes at the local level. During the military regime, the progressive clergy managed to make the church practically the only legitimate focus of resistance and defense of human rights. In the early 1990s, conservative forces, supported by Pope John Paul II, gained power in the church.


Source: U.S. Library of Congress

See also http://religion.rutgers.edu/vri/ - This site is designed to advance research in matters of religion.

 


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